ITSC 8699 Grad Seminar - Spring 2020

Updates

January 20, 2020 

  • Ethics talk Feb 21’s → moved to April 3
  • Visualization talk on Feb 21 instead

When and Where

  • Every Friday at 12: 30 pm
  • Woodward 106

Schedule

Date
Category
Title
Speaker
1/10/2020
General
Min Shin, Ph.D. (Professor in CS)
1/17/2020
Machine Learning
Andrew Vlasic, Ph.D. (Data Scientist at BofA)
1/24/2020
Natural Language Processing
1/31/2020
Bioinformatics
Patrick Robinson, MD
Elizabeth V.
2/7/2020
Robotics
2/14/2020
Computer Vision /Smart Manufacturing
Stephen Welch (VP of Data Science at Mariners)
2/21/2020
Visualization / Virtual Reality
2/28/2020
No seminar:  Attend other talks including CS Faculty Candidate Talk 


3/6/2020
No seminar: Spring recess
Spring recess
Spring recess
3/13/2020
Undergrad Research
UROC
3/20/2020
System Optimization

3/27/2020
Privacy
4/3/2020
Ethics

4/10/2020
Causal Relationships
4/17/2020
Interactive Information Retrieval

4/24/2020

CAIS PhD Townhall meeting

Details

1/17 - “Square Peg, Round Hole, and a Hammer: Improperly Predicting Human Behavior” - Andrew Vlasic, Ph.D. (Data Scientist at BofA)

Abstract
We will go through the logical restrictions of classical probability theory in its applications on predicting human behavior and describe a logical system that is not as restrictive but complete and stable enough to be applied to more accurately predict behavior.

Bio
Dr. Vlasic received Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Mathematics.  His research focus includes formal logic, general probability theory, applications of non-commutative spaces to existing machine learning methods.  He was an Acting Funding officer at Army Research Office overseeing the Probability and Statistics program.  He is current a Data Scientist at Bank of America.

1/24 - Research Strands in Computational Human Behavior Modeling” - Samira Shaikh, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in CS and Psychology)

Abstract
In this talk, I will discuss three different projects related to identifying and characterizing human behavior from natural language. Computational Human Behavior Modeling is a research area at the intersection of computer science and social science, including psychology, sociology, communication, and linguistics. Its objective is to advance both fields by combining the power of data analytics and artificial intelligence with the scientific method for studying human data and human behavior. Social science needs robust computer tools to make advances in the era of big, complex data; conversely, computer science needs guidance from social science theories on how to design and validate such tools.
Bio
Samira Shaikh is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department in the College of Computing and Informatics at the University of North Carolina - Charlotte (UNCC). She has a joint appointment with the Department of Psychology as an Assistant Professor in Cognitive Science. Her research interests are in the areas of Data Science, Computational Sociolinguistics and Computational Social Science, Cognitive Science, Natural Language Processing and Artificial Intelligence.

1/31 - “Multidisciplinary Panel on Coronavirus” - Panel from multiple units on campus 

Info
In response to the ongoing coronavirus infection, we will use this Friday's Grad Seminar session to debate the many facets of this and future viral epidemics. We are convening a panel of experts in various fields from across campus to help us make sense of this.

Panelist