Identify your HostID
  • NOTE — This guide applies only to the Pro License if Multiverse. The Free License uses online cloud validation and does not require you to provide any HostID.

This simple guide helps you locate the HostID, a unique machine identifier for the license server that will spawn floating licenses in your network for the Multiverse Pro Version.  

  • Trivia — the HostID is typically the “MAC address” where MAC stands for “Media Access Control” network identifier, and really is totally unrelated to the Apple Macintosh -)

On Windows

On Windows, start a command prompt and type the ipconfig /all command, then press enter. In the command output, look for the “Physical Address”.

C:\ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : Multiverse-PC
Primary Dns Suffix:
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix:
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) 82579LM Gigabit Network Connection
Physical Address . . . . . . . .  . . . : 00-BA-DD-EC-AF-00
...

In the example above (on line 13) the HostID would be 00BADDECAF00 (you shall ignore the dashes).

  • Multiple physical addresses — If the ipconfig /all command output shows multiple physical addresses you shall look for:
  • The "Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection" (if you are on a Desktop and generally use a wired connection)
  • The "Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection" (if you are on a laptop and generally use a wireless connection)
  • If you have two network cards, and only one has an associated IP address then use the MAC address of the card with the IP address.

  • “Media State: Media disconnected” — If an adapter has “Media State: Media disconnected" you probably don't want to use that HostID address. If you're not sure simply contact us and make sure to include the output of the ipconfig /all command.

On Linux

On Linux, start a terminal and type the ifconfig -a command, then press enter. In the command output, look for the “ether” or “Ethernet HWaddr” (the exact output also depends from your Linux distribution).

[joebang@localhost ~] ifconfig -a

ens33: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 172.16.201.243  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 172.16.201.255
        inet6 fe80::b22:2348:cc24:6457  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 00:DE:AD:BE:EF:00  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 475  bytes 69367 (67.7 KiB)
...

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:BA:DD:EC:AF:00
...